Members Work
for
Club Years 2021 & 2022

April 2021 to March 2023

see <HERE> for Coronavirus Lockdown items
(Spring 2020 - Aug 2021)


 

March AGM 2023 - Display Tables

The Wood Sale

(click any photo for close up views)

The Committee gave their reports. After some 12 years of the same Annual Subscription, an increase of 5 was proposed, which will take effect from the year starting April 2023.
The annual awards were presented (see e-Newsletter for photos).
Clive Potter and Richard Slee have stood down from the Committee and Allan Rae joins.
The Wood Sale was well stocked as usual and this year, with a selection of Burr Oak, English Box and Redwood.
The Chairman had asked Members to bring in some of their favourite pieces they had produced this year and some are shown below.
 


(click any above for close up view)


February 2023 - Comp 5
Buttons

TABLE  A

TABLE  B


February 2023 - Appraisal Table
with Paul Reeves

 Paul Reeves had brought last month's demonstration buttons after completion at home. There were also two Pink Ivory buttons that didn't match the three he had used for his competition entry. When highlighted with Gold Gilt cream, the decoration clearly shows different patterns made; this lack of consistency is common with a chatter or a knurling tool like the Decorating Elf that Paul had used. However, there were still 3 out of the 5 that matched well.  Next was a 'Guiro' (a handheld percussion instrument) made from American Plane with a Rosewood playing stick.
The night-light holder was a piece of spalted burr Beech rescued from his firewood pile which demonstrated that sometimes a natural split in a piece has far more character than a turned rim.  When it comes to goblets, Paul prefers very thin examples. One was turned from a discarded pine curtain pole, which judging from the tightness of the annual rings, originally grew in a cold region of the world.


 Joe van Wyk had used a scroll chuck to produce a fine ornamental lid to his box.  David Game had made good use of some rippled Maple for a stunning box and brought along his home-made Jamb Chuck he had used as his button finisher for the competition; once he had finished one side and parted off, he finished the reverse with the chuck holding the spigot and the dowel portion disappearing inside the headstock, ready to flick the button out of its jamb.
 Rick Patrick had been commissioned by family to turn a bowl sturdy enough for car keys. He had selected some Apple cut from an old orchard over 10 years before and for the ornamental exercise, decided to wallop it with a Ball Pein Hammer followed by a bright shade of Gold Gilt. His other piece was from a fallen Hornbeam from a neighbour's woodland that had blown down over a year before and was showing promise of some interesting figure within but hadn't turn out quite as exciting as hoped.

 Vic Russell has been dissecting a 10-pin bowling ball all for a good reason; having turned bespoke wooden jaws in the round and accurately sawed them into quarters, this was a jig to position them precisely for drilling securing holes to connect to jaw carriers.  He had also found in the props cupboard of 'Some Mothers Do Have Them' a stool sample for the lead character.
 Some more work from Andy Ogilvie's Ornamental Lathe. It probably took some time to do each one but they certainly are a close match. Finally, 4 examples of Ribbon Streptohedrons created by John Bolt.



January 2023 - Appraisal Table
with Andy Ogilvie

(click any below for close up view)

 David Game had brought in 2 fine examples of salvaged worktops highlighting his carpentry skills - the stool had uniform matching decoration on the various components while the Bar Skittles had perfectly flush fitted Laburnum insets for the skittle positions.  His Skittle template had cone-shaped wedges which allowed very accurate marking up with a sharp pencil.
 Andy's first piece was made using an Oval Chuck on his ornamental lathe, which works by
the wood (and the chuck holding it) being moved towards/away from a fixed cutter by a sliding mechanism twice every turn to create the oval shape. The stopper is of Faux Ivory, which he had intended to have as a thin curved oval shape to match the top of the wood. Real Ivory is often ultra thin but clearly Faux Ivory is not as sturdy, so he had to resort to creating an intricate decoration out of the remaining stem.  Andy Ogilvie's hollow form was of Fig which had numerous splits within (somewhat similar to inside Eucalyptus). After turning, he had considered trying to fill the splits but realised it would have been easier to do so before the finishing cuts.


(click any above for close up view)

(click any below for close up view)

(click any above for close up view)

 Following last month's demonstration of thread cutting with a Screw Box & Tap, Paul Reeves had brought in some alternative (more economic) cutting tools.  If you look at the enlarged photo of the 'Nut & Bolt' tool, you will see angled grooves in the ends of the 2 parts so that the waste wood has somewhere to get out of the way. Paul had created these using a thin metal grinder disc attached to his drill.  These nuts & bolts were metric sizes, which produce quite a fine thread; if you can find them, Whitworth size have coarser threads.
Paul also brought an example of a square sided Nut Cracker in response to a Member commenting that someone in his family suffered from poor grip.  With both the top and the body being left square, the action was a lot less difficult.
There were 2 examples of spheres with dome decorations achieved by being held in a Jamb Chuck. Paul warned that this was a difficult job to know when to stop putting in more decoration - he found he could always see an area he thought was too big compared to the rest.
There was a Cedar and Spalted Holly bowl from a competition several years past. It is surprisingly light because the Cedar body had been hollowed out and sharply undercut leaving a lip for the thin sided Holly to be glued in.  Paul thought the beauty of this was that he had easy access to hollow out and didn't have to worry about how smooth or rough the inside work was!
Lastly, Paul had brought in a beautifully figured bowl of Maple Burr.

(click any below for close up view)


(click any above for close up view)

 

Cold weather and travel distance put paid to January's Meeting for David Patrick & Geoff Beddoe. However, they had produced a couple pieces that they thought might be of interest.  The small box with a threaded lid was a collaborative attempt and made of Sapele, 70 x 70mm. The Simon Hope Cutting Jig was straight-forward to use and made an accurate 16tpi thread without suffering serious damage to the thread peaks. The kit also included a 12tpi spindle, which they have yet to experiment with.
 The 250mm diameter segmented bowl had been made by David from two scrap plank ends. The light-coloured wood is Tulip, and the dark wood is Mahogany. The method was simple with only two rules :- The bandsaw cut angle must be 45
AND The distance between the cuts must be equal to the thickness. This is a great introduction into segmented turning, easy to prepare and cost effective.
  The replica oil lamp was made by Geoff Beddoe from a combination a Monkey Puzzle body and a spalted Beech base/lamp carrier. The intention had been to hollow out the inside of the oil reservoir, but Geoff found the wood was too wet and pithy despite more than 18 months in the workshop and thus was left solid.


(click this photo for close up view)


December 2022 - Appraisal Table
with Paul Reeves

(click any below for close up view)


(click any above for close up view)

  John Bolt has added 3 identical new Christmas tree decorations to his collection virtually every December and brought a selection of past & present Gonks, Angels & Xmas Trees.
  The Son of John Williams had bought and renovated the Saab 95 which had been his first car in 1987.  As it was his 50th on the 26th June, his Wife decided to find another Saab's speedo and 'clock' it to show his birth date in the mileage and the pointer against his age.  It took a long search and discrete conversations with elderly/retired car dealers who would admit to being skilled in the 'ancient art' before the job was done.  Dad's job was to turn a hollow form and base ring to display the end result.
  Phil Walker's snowmen were striking for their delicate Padauk 'carrot' noses and their convincing rivet eyes & buttons. One assessment about his box with a finial lid was that the lid felt out of proportion and made the piece appear top heavy.
  Ordinarily, bowls are turned thin to infer a delicate beauty but Alan Brook's Robinia Burr with its thickness of natural edge and sides magnifies the interesting contrast of sapwood to heart.
  Andy's 4 offset-turned Ladies were done as an exercise to discover which different shape, colour and texture worked best.
  Julian Hellebrand is working towards making a Nussknacker (German levered-mouth nut cracker). This was a foot high trial version without the mouth mechanism but great attention to decorative detail.

(click any below for close up view)


(click any above for close up view)


November 2022 - Comp 4
Animals

TABLE  A

(click any below for close up view)


(click any for close up view)

TABLE  B


(click any above for close up view)


November 2022 - Appraisal Table
with Paul Reeves

(click any below for close up view)

(click any above for close up view)

Alan Brooks had brought two 6" bowls superbly finished to show off their grain. The bark of the natural edge had to be supported by superglue, which was subsequently treated with accelerator or allowed to dry before restarting the lathe.
Joe van Wyk's 8" vase had been 'arbortech-ed' and ebonised with metallic spray.  It is easy to agonize how much and how random is enough for each cut of the blade but thankfully, one's initial unease always seems to end in an impressive and coherent overall effect.
Andrew Fairfax's bowl had a great shape on the outside but because of the steep sides, he had found difficulty getting a smooth inside bottom. To get rid of these undulations, Paul suggested one (or a combination of ) - less steep sided design; a gouge with a greater bevel angle; hours with a block sander.  Andy's candlestick had good sharp details in its coves obtained with a round scraper and small gouge.

Jerry Lewis had some magnificent pyrographic examples. He had used artist quality wood dyes on the beautifully coloured tablemat but warned members that after applying acrylic or water colours to bare wood a cellulose sealer should be used as other sealers may lead to unwanted bleeding of colours. Upon being asked how long the mat had taken to decorate, apparently "a short day's work!"  His eye-catching Remembrance bowl with colouring pyro and barbed wire insert came with a 'handle carefully" warning.
Andy Ogilvie's spalted white walnut crotched vase had a remarkably even wall thickness although Paul noted that the inside would have benefited by further smoothing with the help of more coats of sander sealer to stabilize the surface.
Paul explained that with his own bowl, he had deliberately left different levels and areas on the outside to allow for decorative effects such as texturing, pyrography etc
David Hamilton's puzzle might have been a month late but very well made incorporating a number of turned elements.

(click any below for close up view)


October 2022 - Appraisal Table
with Andy Ogilvie

(click any below for close up view)

 Andy expressed delight that a couple of Members had attempted last month's Kilner challenge. He was impressed with the elegant slimness of both lids. Joe van Wyk had turned his jar quite thin which made for a comfortable empty weight. Nigel Batten set off his decorated lid with a matching base plate; he was also commended for including sweets!
 John Bolt had been practising duplicate turning and then constructed a playing surface for various 'pub games' but didn't seem to be keen to progress to turning a chess set although draught pieces could be a possibility.

(click any for close up view)

  Alan Brooks had turned a Banksia Nut into a Bullet Box with Padauk for the box joints and African Black Wood for the bullet head. The joints between the Banksia and Padauk were very accurately done and even the base had been decorated to look like a bullet primer. Next to that was Alan's first attempt at an open spiral. He had used a 'surform' round file and achieved a uniform gap all round.
  Mike Woodhouse had also turned a spiral with a cunningly disguised candle holder having a candle cup at whichever end was upright.
  Andy Ogilvie had also turned a candlestick on his ornamental lathe. With mathematical precision, each flute of the bottom plinth and top head coincided exactly with the peak and trough of each spiral cut; and this was achieved while following a bulbous profile of the column.

(click any on blue cloth for close up view)

  Paul Reeves had brought in a selection of hollow forms to highlight problems facing any new turner. In Paul's early turning days, there weren't specialized tools available so everyone started off hollowing small pieces, which had the advantage of learning how to avoid 'blowing' the piece apart without it costing a fortune whenever your tool broke through to the outside. He then mastered thinner walls before progressing to larger pieces.  The largest of the 3 forms in picture 3 above is a prime example; this Masur Birch wood (blank bought for about 80 just after the Millennium) was one of Paul's early large hollow forms and although lovely to turn, it weighs too much because the walls should have been a little thinner
These days with Rolly Munro, Woodcut or Crown specialized ring, hook or carbide hollowing tools, it is easier to tackle large pieces but harder to grasp the skill of uniformly thin walled vessels with their consequent lightness.
In the same picture 3, the Yew form with a cut in the side was undertaken with more experience. There is only one way to approach the hollowing out; starting from the top opening, hollow out the first half-inch or so and sand before progressing to the next half-inch and sand etc so that the rest of the form below your hollowing/sanding is still solid and less likely to flex. These days, it is common to support the outside with several taut wraps of cling film.  The beauty of the side hole allows one to be precise with uniform thinness.
Probably the best way to hide the finish of the inside of your hollow form is to leave an opening so small that no finger can get down it to check by feel. This will require taking the neck out further down the vessel to access a larger diameter in order for your tool to hollow out. The neck is then refitted with the help of some decoration to camouflage the join.  It is also advisable to flare the inside of the neck at the bottom to make any view down the spout more natural.  An alternative way to mask the internal finish is to coat the inside with matt black paint, although beware that some porous woods might bleed through some of the black paint, particularly if thin walled.


September 2022 - Comp 3
Puzzles & Tricks

TABLE  A

(click any below for close up view)

 Vic's laminated cone of Yew, Ovangkol & Elm had a Black Wood bar seemingly locked within it, but with a knowing thump in the right place, it can be removed.
 Not so obvious in this photo but David's red & blue candy striped strings seemed to have an unnatural influence on each other. If any acorn was extended, the acorn that could pull it back was attached to a different coloured string at the opposite end of the stick.
 Al's sphere had a hidden box within it but cunningly concealed by the ornamental coves. It opened by pushing the correct dimple on the opposite side to the box. This required very precise turning to maintain tight joints.
 Andy Ogilvie's interlaced rings was fooling everyone trying to work out how to separate one. The only solution is with a hacksaw!
 Paul's nail puzzle (balance 6 of the nails without any touching anything more than the central nail and each other) was turned Laburnum on an Elm Burr base. The Laburnum nails were so dense, they sounded like metal when dropped upon the table.
 Nick's magic ball-in-a-beehive trick had been precisely turned but had suffered slightly by the Box Wood moving since it had left his lathe.


(click any above for close up view)

 

 TABLE  B

Regrettably, there were no entries forward for this table


September 2022 - Appraisal Table
with Paul Reeves

(click any below for close up view)

(click any above for close up view)

 In the spirit of this month's theme of Puzzles & Tricks, David produced his 'embodied Lime arrows' ending up in impossible positions leaving one to ponder how it's done.
The solution involves turning the arrow separately then leaving the arrowhead in boiling water for 15 minutes before squashing the blade back towards the shaft using a bench vice, protected with polythene against rust & stains and ensuring that the edges were being crushed and not just folded over. David left the arrow & vice in this position for 3 days before pushing it through the apple/goblet which had been drilled with a hole slightly larger than the arrow's shaft. With the arrow now in its final position, he submersed the crushed head in a cup of hot water which miraculously allowed the wood cells to expand and return the arrowhead to its original shape.
 David's Uphill Roller is an optical illusion. Although not so evident in the photo, the wood is thinner where the arms are joined at the right of the photo than the opposite ends at the left of the photo, yet the roller always moves from the apparent lower end to the higher end.

The reason is due to the cone shape of the roller; when at the lower jointed end, the cone has larger diameters resting on the track arms which makes the centre of gravity of the cone higher than when it rests on the track arms at the separated ends where the cone rests on smaller diameters. Although the track arms are increasing in height, the slope is not enough to negate the effect of the reducing cone diameters.  As gravity acts upon the C of G, the cone has to move from the right side of the picture to the left.
 Vic's captured mouse within a Sycamore wedge of cheese was another marvel to ponder. Despite all attempts, one couldn't pull the mouse clear of the cheese.
 Joe's logic string puzzles relied upon planning several moves ahead. Fortunately, he was around to reset it when your editor managed to get it in a more complicated knot than he started with!

(click any below for close up view)


(click any above for close up view)

 Paul's Oak sapwood platter had moved and cracked slightly over time, but after applying some oil, the piece decided to resemble an enormous Pringle and he wasn't too sure what to do with it.
 His cruet set was designed so that each lid had identical seats so that although the hollowed bodies were individual, any of the lids would fit them.
 Paul's Ribbed Bowl showed testament even when glued to a former, there is still a minimum thickness you can achieve before the problem of flexing disintegrates the piece.


August 2022 - Appraisal Table
with Paul Reeves


(click any bowl for close up view)

 The recent Ellingham Show (returned after a 3 year absence) was both hot and a great success for showing the prowess of the Club.  A firm favourite with children was turning tooth fairy boxes out of spalted branch wood, particularly if they were fortunate enough to be awarded the finished item. Paul could not be convinced that the boxes should be enlarged to accommodate a two pound coin.
 A common fault with hollow forms is variable thickness of walls, particularly where the inside cross-section starts to reduce; mostly caused by the turner pressing outwards and downwards rather than guiding the tool around to match the outside edge. A good check of success (or not) is to look into the opening while a bright light is shone close to the outside surface.  Paul's example was of Cedar, which is especially difficult to turn a thin wall and as such, not best suited for hollow forms.
 Paul's rippled Ash Bowl was to highlight that the bottom of your piece can look as nice as the top. This bowl was buffed and waxed with Carnuba whereas the White Walnut Bowl next to it was finished with mineral oil, which never sets so has the drawback of eventually washing off and leaving a dull finish.  This doesn't happen with oils like Walnut or Lemon Oil which will set hard/cure after several days and can maintain their sheen.


(click any above for close up view)

Terry's 2 boxes out of branch wood of a fruit tree are ideal for matching grain & a good fitting lid, even 3 years after they were turned.
Ian had turned a vase with a glass tube well hidden within.
Joe's very thin half-sized boater hat was remarkably unaffected by shrinkage or wrinkling. Apparently long dried roughed out blanks that had received their final turn on his lathe the day before.


(click any above for close up view)

 John's Banksia had been turned a few years ago but he still remembers the hard sharp chips spinning off his gouge.
 New Member, Phil had produced a Sycamore Bowl which he had finished by hand-buffing with Carnuba wax. Paul admired the contrasting wooden lid but warned that the fit was likely to change from day to day.
 I had initially thought that Andy's candle holder was a clever piece of artistry, but apparently, it was a natural casualty of the heat inside the Ellingham Show's tent where the Club had put up its display table.


(click any above for close up view)

 David's beautifully produced small table with elegant cabriole feet set on the diagonal is a testament to his Cabinet Maker's apprenticeship. He had helpfully brought an example of its construction using bare-faced tenons.


July 2022 - Comp 2
Bird Box

TABLE  A

(click any below for close up view)

(click any above for close up view)

Nick's winning entry had used some verdigris wax on the lid and body of his bird box which would suggest water-proofing qualities although Liberon don't specifically list it for external wood.  David's green effect was achieved with stain.
Chairman Andy highlighted that virtually all of us spend a long time with our competition entries but whenever Paul conducts a demonstration, he invariably enters competitions with his demonstration piece produced within 90 minutes including many discussion points. His only 'tweaks at home' this time were to paint the lid and re-scorch the body.
Most spotted Andy's pyrographed verse but few noticed the twist opening of his lid for easy access to clean.
John & Alan's entries were obviously not intended for practical use but their detailing and finish were a delight to behold.

TABLE  B

(click any below for close up view)

(click any above for close up view)

Nigel Batten's innovative thatch lid and pyrographed pun was a deserved winner.
Geoff had chosen old-school design with a perch but his was carefully finished off rather than just a plain dowel.
Joe's piece was purely ornamental and had produced a beautifully textured roof.


July 2022 - Appraisal Table
with Paul Reeves


(click any above for close up view)

 Nick's model of a tree with ornamental bird boxes was a colourful bit of fun but must have been a nightmare to transport to Club Night.
 David's Ladybird Moneybox has a secret opening to get to the hoard; a wooden peg attached to the bug's head clears a turned ring when pulled out to release the ladybird's body and lid. Simple but very impressive.
 We're guessing Trevor's grandchild has got a little taller. An attractive effect on the spindles and chair back.


(click any above for close up view)

 This photo is misleading because John's oak platter is 23" in diameter; fellow member Geoff Hewitt had a lot of kitchen laminate worktop over following an under-sized order by his kitchen designer. Paul commented that glue in laminates are often so weak that they can readily fly apart when turned. John had applied a second layer of worktop at right angles to the first which helps to stabilise the turned piece although it is still difficult to prevent pull-outs where the top & bottom layers meet. He also commented that the underneath decoration made the upper side look quite plain.
 Andy has been encouraging members to have a go at flasks and has lead by example; Paul commented that its heaviness exposed that not much had been hollowed but it bore some impressive ornamental lathe work. As a general tip, he advised to be careful turning a spout to finish with a thin edge as the grain of the wood is likely to rebel.
 Rick made his first attempt at using a Proxxon carving tool on this Maple bowl rim. In some respects, becoming competent & confident in using the tool can easily lead to a uniform (and boring) marks whereas the irregular depths, spacing & angles of a beginner tends to look random and more interesting.


(click any above for close up view)

 Rob's ash bowl appeared to have been sprayed with a black lacquer whereas he had applied Liberon Black Polish (an ebonizing French polish). He did add that it took "a lot of layers" to reach such a high gloss.
 Phil's candlestick telephone was well worth a close look with its sharp lines and clean surfaces.
 Andy's shiny new pens looks like he's got his Christmas gifts sorted.


(click any above for close up view)

Vic's hairbrush bristles were fitted a traditional way - lengths of bristles were pulled in by some fishing line around their centres and tied off at the back of the brush head. His teardrop shaped paperweight had a wonderful tactile feel in one's hand. The button was about 8" diameter and Paul wondered whether some copper wiring through the holes might enhance the piece.


(click any above for close up view)

Paul had brought some of his more exotic woods. The first was Ziricote from Central America, which is becoming rarer and expensive. Its beautiful wavy grain (nothing to do with annual growth rings) has a luxurious appearance and tends to be used for the finest furniture or musical instruments. Paul warned that it is still available but do take care to see that the lumber has many black wavy marks - the cheap ones tend to have only a few.


(click any above for close up view)

Following on from Mike Haselden's end of demo party piece, Paul had brought in, by coincidence, some of his own miniatures.
His Laburnum boxes were obviously dry when he turned them as they still fall inside one another with a soft close action.
Alder Burr is another unusual wood to find but is worth getting as the wood looks pretty and is so stable after turning.


June 2022 - Appraisal Table
with Paul Reeves

(click any below for close up view)

(click any above for close up view)

David Game had brought a whistle (which can often take a lot of time fiddling in order to produce a decent sound but on this occasion worked well straight off the lathe), a Maple saucer, and an offset bowl turned using a faceplate.
Alan Brooks had made use of a 'lazy-susan' to produce a 3-legged stool with a rotating seat scrounged from a superior worktop.
I had originally labelled Vic Russell's piece as an ice-pick but stood corrected that it was a Birdcage Awl with a beautifully turned Pink Ivory handle and a hand twist of the awl itself done by Vic.  I'd like to think that I was swayed in my identification by the sparkling wine cork, but I suspect it was more influenced by my imaginary life style or love of crime fiction.
Joe van Wyk has been cutting bottles again and this example was a crystal clear example with the added surprise of lights.  It seems Joe has nearly as many rejected attempts of glass cutting as he has successes.

(click any below for close up view)

(click any above for close up view)

Three more bowls were up for appraisal - Bill Gibson had turned an edgeless Sycamore; Ian McClure with Zebrano and Ian Wright with Elm. Richard Colenutt had brought one of his try-outs for the Unnatural Natural Edged competition and Mick Boxall had brought an elaborate Silver Birch candlestick.
Clearly Mick had spent a lot of time and work on this piece but it was interesting to hear how it would be assessed in a competition. From bottom to top, he had turned a torus within the base, 2 different sized bead mouldings and two capitals leading to the candle cup. Individually, they were pleasing shapes but lacked matching design profiles and symmetry within the one column. Something to consider for the piece to be marked better might be if, for example, the candle cup had a matching torus, the beads were of matching shapes and relative heights and similarly for the capitals or even follow the maxim, "less is sometimes more".

(click any below for close up view)

(click any above for close up view)

Paul had brought some of his own work to suggest ideas we might not have thought of.
The latest competition required some hollowing and if this technique is new to you, he recommended to practice with a wide opening to start with as you can then see clearly which angle to present in order to get the best cut.
A foot doesn't have to be formed from the body of the turned piece - the above is accomplished with 3 hobnails. The decoration was created from an old chisel with 3 beads ground into the end.
Decoration can sometimes be found within the wood. Paul had brought a fine example of 'rippled' in the side grain of Sycamore caused by compression of the grain by the weight of the tree or a heavy branch moving in the wind as it grew.

 


May 2022 - Comp 1
Unnatural Natural Edge

TABLE  A

(click any below for close up view)

(click any above for close up view)

 

TABLE  B

Regrettably, there were no entries forward for this table


February 2022 - Comp 5
Added Value to a Two-Part Candlestick/Lamp

TABLE  A

(click any below for close up view)

TABLE  B

(click any below for close up view)

 


February 2022 - Appraisal Table
with Paul Reeves

(click any below for close up view)

Remarks  :  Andy Ogilvie's box of contrasting woods was a unique and very fine example; the Sycamore vase of Terry Miles had a hollowed out bowl bottom with the 'trumpet' joined invisibly; a natural edge bowl of Jerry Lewis; a 'try-out' in Sapele of Alan Brooks' offset candlestick winning competition piece; David Game had selected Rhododendron for his box and a good matched pair of candlesticks from a laminate he had made. Joe Van Wyk's spectacular lamp looked like a labour of love.


January 2022  -  Comp 4
Box of Contrasting Woods

TABLE  A

Remarks : Paul's double ended box's support took longer to produce than the box itself; Andy's Rosewood box benefitted from embellishments made on his Ornamental Lathe; Vic's new tool makes another spectacularly sharp finish on his inlaid Yew lid plus a good fit; Trevor produced an elegantly proportioned finial for his Elm and Padauk box; Bill's eye-catching box body was achieved with a tenon saw; and a colourful selection of Pear, Laburnum & Ash for David's piece.

TABLE  B

Remarks : Nigel's Oak & Lignum Vitae box demonstrated the problem with turning old bowling balls - they tend to be riddled with internal cracks.


January 2022 - Appraisal Table
with Paul Reeves

(click any below for close up view)

(click any above for close up view)


December 2021  -  Comp 3
Offset Turned Bowls

TABLE  A

 

TABLE  B

Remarks : David Hamilton's piece had its own foot attached rather than relying upon a plate stand or doughnut; Alan Brook's was of Tulip Wood with an attractive coloured grain incorporated into a recess; Andrew Fairfax's had a matt finish effect using Lemon Oil.


December 2021 - Appraisal Table
with Paul Reeves

Remarks :  The realistic looking snow of John Bolt's Smokin' Snowy was achieved with a coat of exterior textured paint; Alan Brooks piece was made from a segmented Walnut worktop off cut which can be difficult to work.


November 2021  -  Comp 2
Plates & Platters

TABLE  A

Remarks : Joint Winner Bill Gibson turned a double sided platter hence the two photos; Paul's demonstration piece was finished by continuing his spectacular decoration; Vic Russell's had a beautiful crisp and intricate border; Nick & Trevor made different uses of Milliput; Andy produced intricate decoration with perfectly graduated circles spaced precisely between the two offset outer edges.

 

TABLE  B

Remarks :  Andrew Fairfax's winning platter was clearly a labour of love; Al Brooks' darkened piece was achieved by encapsulating it in a container of Ammonia for many many hours.

 


November 2021 - Appraisal Table
with Paul Reeves

After several examples of cubes with holes in every face, Andy went a step further with a sphere;
Nick's embossed oak leaves were accomplished by stippling back the surrounding rim with a Dremel;
Bill's platter shows off a distinct 'chatoyant'
(cats eye) ripple figure so he fittingly kept his decoration minimal;
David H's Japanese lacquered effect was produced by applying the two acrylic colours roughly level and then dry brushing the red down over the black and then finished with dry brushing the black upwards with another clean brush;
Clive's hollow form seemed impossible with no apparent join below the neck, but was in fact hollowed out from underneath with a cunningly disguised base;
Having rescued a knurled old Cherry crown holding down a corner of a tarpaulin for more than a year, David P found its crevasses so deep after removing its dirt & bark that perhaps a red resin was the answer for a whole bowl. He said it was a joy to turn something visually pleasing and useful from a lump of rubbish.


October 2021 - Comp 1
Treen

Turned piece(s) of small functional wooden household objects.

TABLE  A

Remarks : Clive Potter's lampshade had the unusual but stylish property of a round top and a square-ish base. A fortunate result of turning green Monkey Puzzle to a thin layer.

 

TABLE B

Remarks : Andy Ogilvie's Pinch Pots had Perspex lids (not obvious from photo) so that salt or pepper would be clearly identified;
Ian McClure's box contained his crochet hooks and still had room for the doily he was working on;
Mark Codling's elliptical bowl is out of Strawberry Tree which has a proneness to warp spectacularly;
Dave Hamilton's Lateral Flow Test-tube holder raised a smile from all;
Nick Gosden's lighthouse Pepper Grinder was one of a bulk commission;
Jeff Hewett's general pot was most remarkable for the fact that Jeff only had his first experience of turning the previous day on his neighbour's lathe. He was applauded for probably the shortest number of turning hours experience before entering a competition!


October 2021 - Appraisal Table
with Paul Reeves

AND FINALLY
Below is what Paul Reeves describes as his, "first complete Monkey Puzzle bowl."
Whenever a demonstration has to be prepared to a deadline, commissions invariably get delayed so this piece missed this month's Members' Work table by a couple of days.
It is of spalted Monkey Puzzle; produced & now delivered for the kind donor of the tree from which it came.

(click for close up view)

 


September 2021 - Award of 2019 Club Prizes

As the March 2020 meeting never took place, the delayed distribution of those prizes were awarded at this meeting.


September 2021 - Appraisal Table

As this was the first meeting in 19 months, the remit was to bring along any/all one's Covid Lockdown turned projects.  There was a good display but, unfortunately, the evening's prize giving and demonstration resulted in insufficient time for appraisals to be given.
Here are some of Members' work brought on the evening.



May 2020 - On Line Comp 1
Any Miniature

Any turning not wider nor taller than 25mm or 50mm

25mm TABLE


 


 

50mm TABLE